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Selfies vs Savings

selfies

When a guy sitting next to my table in a café and having his lunch takes a pic of his meal first and then another one of his very own self, I take it quite normally. And I am 101% sure he is going to either post it on Instagram or send it to someone via Snapchat or make it go online in some other way.  


It seems like we spend most of our lives in the quest for validation without even realizing it. Have you ever asked yourself why do we take selfies and post them online? Is this an act of expressing ourselves, or sharing our best moments with friends, or maybe trying to feel real and independent? I would answer Yes to all of these.

Selfies are a mainstream. And, like it or not, you are going to meet them in bulk when swiping your newsfeed. Because it is so damn easy to take a selfie and to show the world the better us, the happier and the more independent us.


This topic has intrigued me for a while and got me thinking. I realized how easy it is to use technology to showcase ourselves and to speak up. On the other hand, however, we might be facing a ton of problems like the huge student loan debt or the credit card debt that seem to never leave us alone. Maybe it’s weird how I try to find a connection between our selfie habits and saving habits. But it seems like we lack self-control when it comes to showcasing our saving habits and the way we control our finances. Why is it so easy for us to take a selfie than to control our finances?

 

In fact, numbers show that we spend more than we save. According to a study by Moody’s Analytics, our savings rate has dipped to negative 2% making us the only generation with a negative savings rate. And there could be millions of reasons why we cannot or do not want to save money. Some experts say it’s because the recession led the millennials to distrust the banks. Others argue that we don’t understand finance and that half of us do not grasp how pensions work. Yet up until the mid-1980’s Americans saved a significant amount of their earnings.

 

Really? Is controlling your finances so tough? Why do we use the power of self-expression through selfies but we hardly ever use the power of controlling our finances and making informed decisions?

 

I wonder how honest we are with ourselves when it comes to managing our finances. Could we be as much carefree and independent when it comes to showcasing our saving habits like we do it in the case of our selfies? How much of editing work would it take to make our finances look perfect? Think yourself. Would you rather post a selfie online than a graph of your monthly expenditure? Please share your opinions below. I am really looking forward to seeing what you think.

 


Also published on Medium.

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